The Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act

imagesCAO59E8DThe Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996, Division C of Pub.L. 104–208, 110 Stat. 3009-546, enacted September 30, 1996 vastly changed the immigration laws of the United States.

Now then in our last several submissions it has been announced that with each new law that comes into existence, its predecessor has also changed the immigration laws of the United States. Our difficulty is why, or more, what is it that is at stake that compels a new Congress or Presidential Administration to willfully take on this ostensible unmanageable task?

This act states that immigrants unlawfully present in the United States for 180 days but less than 365 days must remain outside the United States for three years unless they obtain a pardon. If they are in the United States for 365 days or more, they must stay outside the United States for ten years unless they obtain a waiver. If they return to the United States without the pardon, they may not apply for a waiver for a period of ten years.

Deportees may be held in jail for months, even as much as two years, before being brought before an immigration board, at which defendants need to pay for their own legal representation. In 2001, the Supreme Court curtailed the Immigration Service’s ability to hold deportees indefinitely in Zadvydas v. Davis.

The Act has been applied much more vigorously since 9/11. At least 1000 British citizens were affected by the law in 2003.

Needless to say that the entire landscape of immigration reform and upwards of naturalizing a person as a U.S. citizen has taken many, many hits since the attack on our homeland on September 11, 2001 as well it should have.

IIRIRA addressed the relationship between the federal government and local governments. Section 287(g) is a program of the act that permits the U.S. Attorney General to enter into agreements with state and local law enforcement imagesCAD3UH1Tagencies, permitting designated officers to perform immigration law enforcement functions, pursuant to a Memorandum of Agreement. This section does not simply deputize state and local law enforcement personnel to enforce immigration matters.

The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) is a United States federal law considered to be a fundamental shift in both the method and goal of federal cash assistance to the poor. The bill added a workforce development component to welfare legislation, encouraging employment among the poor. The bill was a cornerstone of the Republican Contract with America and was introduced by Rep. E. Clay Shaw, Jr. (R-FL-22) who believed welfare was partly responsible for bringing immigrants to the United States. President Bill Clinton signed PRWORA into law on August 22, 1996, fulfilling his 1992 campaign promise to “end welfare as we have come to know it.”

The political atmosphere at the time of PRWORA’s passage included a Republican-controlled House of Representatives and Senate (defined by their Contract with America) and a Democratic president.
Since 1986 and the first amnesty act, The Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA), Pub.L. 99–603, 100 Stat. 3359, enacted November 6, 1986, it has become overwhelmingly evident to us that poll after poll, survey after survey, even public opinion polls and I do not know why…but it sure seems to me that the American people simply don’t want the kind of “Immigration Reform” that every president has campaigned on will ever be done – at least according the way the Americans want it done.

This is a matter that needs to be examined, analyzed, and rectified immediately – and not the old fashioned way or the new fashioned way of “well it’s obvious that we’ve become inept, or ineffective at controlling our own borders and immigration policy, so let someone else do it…” brought on by corruption and issued through the form of executive orders by the President. That notion alone has got me going now…I don’t believe the President or Congress has the right to allow 11 to 21 million people onto our land.

In finale, or at least until we examine the Voting ID Act and its disastrous effects regarding racial profiling or any other thing that has the smell of politically correct rubbish attached to it please continue to read. Thank you.

 

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About Jon-Paul

Academia, Constitution, Musicianship, all around Caucasian male, straight, and professes Jesus Christ as the Lord of my life. Guitars -- Classical, Acoustic, A/E, Strat, a real bassist at heart, Les Paul Standard bass.
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6 Responses to The Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act

  1. The waiver is a right of the immigrants.
    What is the real problem with the new Immigration law? Racism?

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    • Jon-Paul says:

      Hey there Susannah or Simone:

      I will be more than happy and accommodating to research the actual law from which you state: “The waiver is a right of the immigrants;” however, it would be nice if you could assist me pursuant to what law, act, bill, or executive order one might look at. I wasn’t aware that there was a “new Immigration law in existence. I will more than proffer up that I know that there has been changes either added or rectified but none of the aforementioned changes completes a new law on the books.

      This is where I can answer part of you question: President Obama, full of himself and quite openly has unconstitutionally made changes that affect the INS which is completely out of his jurisdiction as a President. Not that he hasn’t tried mind you. I would actually argue the follow ‘real life’ notion with anyone on the High Court or Congress or the President. In 1789 the charter was made and agreed to that Congress would be empowered to set up an Immigration and Naturalization Service. Which by whoever’s standards was ineffective, especially the amount of time an individual had to spend in the USA before they were even considered for permanent resident status (PRS). The only reason that I bring this forth is because in the fall of 1790 they’d already been sued in a rather nonchalant case. Again in 1791 Congress was sued again — not on any matter of relevance — but one of protocol. Having written this out and please see “Categories” insofar as there are thousands of articles there on immigration reform.

      The real problem with immigration reform law is that NOTHING is being reformed. Moreover, since “reform” is the issue of the day, my suggestion is that Congress put some rules, policies, regulations, and laws together to perform reform on. The status of affairs in this nation (USA) is absolutely egregious with whatever immigration policy they think they have because I can ensure you they don’t. To further assist you with your pursuit for an answer this is how the new policy has gone down. President Obama having reckless disregard for the rule of law, wrote a Memorandum of Agreement to Janet Napolitano instructing her as Secretary of DHS predicated upon the far fetched Patriot Act to enact with USCIS, Justice, and DHS what to do. Therefore, most people think that Obama has done something deceptive by ignoring Congress (whose Charter it is in all matters INS) and he has; but worse yet is the way in which he (as always) used women to enact his sleazy crimes. Think about it…NHHS is Janet Sibelius taking real heat via Obamacare; Janet Napolitano at DHS, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, there is no end to this list. Hope I’ve helped. Please write back, email or post, okay. I am wondering why you put in the word “Racism.”

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  2. The MAD Jewess says:

    You can call me Pauli. Its cool.

    Keep up the work.
    Sick of these lousy jerks

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    • Jon-Paul says:

      Hey there Ms. Jewess aka “The Mad One”:

      Only kidding up on the other line — where does Pauli come from? And oh yes, this reply has the expressed intention of guaranteeing that you have a nice and wonderful day! Cheers!

      What did you do over the weekend?

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  3. The MAD Jewess says:

    I cant stand this insanity with illegals, the GOP traitors. Im so mad I cant even have a nice day anymore

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    • Jon-Paul says:

      Hey there “Mad One” please don’t feel like the Lone Ranger on this one. The GOP is falling for the nonsense we teach our kids to ignore; moreover, the GOP is so far off of the rails…sheeeit! And yes this really pisses me off — it’s the notion that Congressional officials are seeking their own interests here and NOT those of the people. Always gr8 to hear from you!!

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