A twice-deported undocumented immigrant fights to stay with his family in the U.S.

A twice-deported undocumented immigrant fights to stay with his family in the U.S.

2eagle Angel Farias’ wife, two children and five siblings were born here in the United States. His mother and two other siblings are naturalized citizens. Angel came here in 1985 at age 7.

Like many undocumented immigrants, Angel’s family is a hodge-podge of those who have papers and those who don’t. And even Obama’s proposed Executive Order wouldn’t change his status: Angel has been deported twice.

Both times, he walked across the Sonoran desert with a backpack of food and water so that he could return to his family. Just a bit more illegal behavior that supports that Mr. Farias is not the kind of immigrant that the U.S. is interested in. After first deportation Mr. Farias is supposed to be suspended for ten (10) years on re-entering the U.S.A.

Angel’s family migrated from Michoacán to Washington’s Yakima Valley, where he and his siblings often skipped school to help their parents harvest cherries and asparagus. After 30 years in Yakima, Angel was able to start his own business as a house painter. He talks and eats like an American. His son speaks better English than Spanish. Yakima is all he’s ever known.

But U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents came and found him. The last DHS_cis_1_T%20_SearchResultstime was in 2014. He appealed his deportation, so he spent 14 months in the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, where he led a hunger strike and spent weeks in solitary confinement.

His detention impacted the Farias family’s fortunes drastically. Angel was the undocumented breadwinner for a family of American citizens (by default). While he was away, they lost their house to foreclosure, and their credit was ruined. Unable to pay bills, Angel’s wife struggled day-to-day to put food on the table.

By the time he was released on bond, Angel’s father had passed away and his wife had been diagnosed with colon cancer.

Many undocumented immigrants are like Farias – they’ve been in the country for decades, have U.S.-born children but are barred from any path to legal status.

Angel’s first deportation order was for a misdemeanor arrest on charges that were later dropped. The next two were for returning to the U.S. illegally.

Angel’s history bars him from obtaining family visas and, while he has relatives in Mexico with ties to violent crime, it also makes it highly unlikely he’ll be granted asylum here.

His life provides a glimpse on the emotional and financial impact that deportations and detentions can have on one American family.

No! My heart is not crying for Mr. Farias or any member of his family. His wife, five siblings and two children were born American citizens. Hey Congress — it’s time to get real with the Citizenship Clause in the 14th Amendment!

Moreover, we find it very difficult to believe that someone here since 1985 would be having difficulty finding a way to at least be granted Green card status.

Arden V

About Jon-Paul

Academia, Constitution, Musicianship, all around Caucasian male, straight, and professes Jesus Christ as the Lord of my life. Guitars -- Classical, Acoustic, A/E, Strat, a real bassist at heart, Les Paul Standard bass.
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