Deportations, Operation Wetback, and further deportation measures are justified

Deportations, Operation Wetback, and further deportation measures are justified

living-shadows1An estimated 11 million immigrants live and work in the United States illegally. Their fate is one of the big policy questions facing the country. The story of how that population grew so large is a long one that’s mostly about Mexico, and full of unintended consequences.

As a matter of record, The Contemplative Thinker.com believes that this should not be the case whatsoever. Indeed, we would love our record to show that every member of congress and POTUS since, to be fair, the year 1970, should be mandated to sacrifice most of their pensions and then again, there are various certain members that have lived through this problem and still done nothing about it.

Prior to the 1920s, the U.S. had few restrictions on immigration, save for a few notable exclusions. “Basically, people could show up,” says Jeffrey Passel, of the Pew Research Center. For workers in Mexico, crossing into the U.S. made a lot of economic sense, then and now.

During World War II, the federal government created a legal system for Mexican farmworkers to come work in the U.S. It was called the Bracero program, and its advocates were growers who wanted a ready supply of farm labor. In its peak year, it brought in 400,000 legal workers nationwide.cw7rwo2ukaejcx6

Critics said the Bracero program cost American farmworkers jobs. It was problematic in other ways, too. For one, workers were bound to one employer. We do not think that this system was fair; nonetheless, the Bracero Program did in fact, kept records on who, what, when, and where the immigrants came.  The program was a success for America, especially when tracking movements inside the USA.

“That person had total control over your life,” says Doris Meissner, former commissioner for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. “And that leads to a very unequal relationship, and it’s a recipe for exploitation.”

Another criticism of the program was that it was thought to depress the wages of American workers. President John F. Kennedy campaigned against the Bracero program, and his successor, Lyndon Johnson, ended it in 1965. It was not replaced. We would like to note that the use of JFK’s name in this matter is unjustified insofar as he was murdered prior to anything happened.

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Furthermore, we feel if you want to use well-respected names let’s keep it to the letter. President Johnson, for all it is worth when he took over from President J. F. Kennedy, had little to nothing was done until Kennedy’s term ended. Then came the “The Great Society” and of course, the escalation of American’s into Viet Nam.

If one really wants to look into blame about the numbers of illegal immigrants now in the US here are two big names I would encourage everybody to look into Senator Robert F. Kennedy as well as the amount of work Senator Ted Kennedy did as far as the Civil Rights Act. The original act was not only for American citizens but just as in Entitlements, are available to everyone who comes here.

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About Jon-Paul

Academia, Constitution, Musicianship, all around Caucasian male, straight, and professes Jesus Christ as the Lord of my life. Guitars -- Classical, Acoustic, A/E, Strat, a real bassist at heart, Les Paul Standard bass.
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